Numeric Software
"Frequently asked questions require frequent answering."

RadSat Frequently Asked Questions
Why do the radar and/or satellite images take so long to download?
The speed of your network connection can cause RadSat to be sluggish when downloading radar and satellite images. Try decreasing the number of images used for animation. For extremely slow network connections only download a single image. RadSat allows independent selection of the number of radar or satellite images used for animation. Radar images generally download faster than satellite images.
Why does RadSat sometimes get my location wrong?
When a reliable location source is not available, RadSat attempts to determine your location based on your Internet Protocol (IP) address. Sometimes the physical location reported for your IP address is nowhere near your actual location. If this is happening, then manually select a radar station or specify a latitude and longitude near your current location.
Why are the satellite images from sources outside the United States old?
Apparently some international agreement has expired.
What are the different types of radar images?
Base Reflectivity

This is a display of echo intensity (reflectivity) measured in dBZ (decibels of Z, where Z represents the energy reflected back to the radar). "Reflectivity" is the amount of transmitted power returned to the radar receiver. Base Reflectivity images are available at several different elevation angles (tilts) of the antenna and are used to detect precipitation, evaluate storm structure, locate atmospheric boundaries and determine hail potential. The base reflectivity image is from the lowest "tilt" angle (0.5 degrees). This means the radar's antenna is tilted 0.5 degrees above the horizon.

Composite Reflectivity

This display is of maximum echo intensity (reflectivity) from any elevation angle at every range from the radar. This product is used to reveal the highest reflectivity in all echoes. When compared with Base Reflectivity, the Composite Reflectivity can reveal important storm structure features and intensity trends of storms.

Base Velocity

This display of radial velocity represents the overall wind field. Green colors indicate wind moving toward the radar with red colors indicating wind moving away from the radar. The maximum range of this product is 124 nm (about 143 miles) from the radar location.

Storm Relative Motion

This display is of radial velocity of the wind relative to the storm's motion. The result is a picture of the wind as if the storms were stationary. This often unmasks storms that rotate (supercells) which can be a precursor to the formation of tornadoes. Green colors indicate wind moving toward the radar with red colors indicating wind moving away from the radar. The maximum range of this product is 124 nm (about 143 miles) from the radar location.

One-hour Precipitation

This is an image of estimated one-hour precipitation accumulation. This product is used to assess rainfall intensities for flash flood warnings, urban flood statements and special weather statements. The maximum range of this product is 124 nm (about 143 miles) from the radar location. This image will not display accumulated precipitation more distant than 124 nm, even though precipitation may be occurring at greater distances. To determine accumulated precipitation at greater distances you should link to an adjacent radar.

Storm Total Precipitation

This image is of estimated accumulated rainfall, continuously updated, since the last one-hour break in precipitation. This image is used to locate flood potential over urban or rural areas, estimate total basin runoff and provide rainfall accumulations for the duration of the event. The maximum range of this product is 124 nm (about 143 miles) from the radar location. This product will not display accumulated precipitation more distant than 124 nm, even though precipitation may be occurring at greater distances. To determine accumulated precipitation at greater distances link to an adjacent radar.